Baker Memorial Sanatorium

Posted: July 6, 2012 in Local Investigations

We are very excited to be conducting our second training session with newest team member Michelle tomorrow night at 9pm at Baker Sanatorium Historical Site.

The Central Alberta Sanatorium – renamed the Baker Memorial Sanatorium in 1950, after Dr. A.H. Baker, who served as Director for thirty years – was established in 1920 in Robertson, which was near Calgary.  It was built specifically to house tubercular civilians and WWI veterans who were transferred from Frank, Alberta.  From 1942 to 1945 the center also treated Japanese evacuees.

By 1960, the sanatorium was beginning to empty out completely. In 1961, some rooms were converted to make room for severely mentally-challenged patients. In 1962, the Baker Center was added to the facility as an extension of Alberta School Hospital for the treatment of mentally disabled children. In 1974, the program expanded to include mentally disabled adults. In 1975, the Baker Center separated from the sanatorium. By 1980, though the Baker Center continued to operate, the sanatorium was permanently closed. There was no further need for the services it was providing, as tuberculosis patients were transferred to the Foothills Hospital.

In 1989, Alberta Public Works, Supply, and Services demolished the buildings, as there were no more tuberculosis patients to treat.

During its years of operation, the Baker Sanatorium saw approximately 10,000 patients. While it is known that many patients died in the center, it is unclear at this point how many of those deaths were attributed to tuberculosis.

Our goal in this investigation is to attempt to make contact with any patients whose spirits may still be attached to the site. Visitors to what is now called Baker Park have reported feeling watched, experiencing uneasiness and heaviness, and an overall “creepy vibe”.  Some visitors have also reported taking their dogs through the park and the dogs suddenly freezing in place and refusing to move.  Our hope with this investigation is to validate or debunk these claims while teaching our new member how to conduct an interview with the dead.

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Comments
  1. Catherine Thomas says:

    My Mother’s husband, Harold Norberg died in the San in February 6,1942 Can anyone tell me where the records are kept as I would like the record for Harold Norberg.
    I also worked in the San in 1964 til 1968 I will be away til June 10, 2016

    • I’m not sure where you would go for patient records, Catherine. You could try contacting City Hall, or maybe the downtown library, where the archives are usually held. Either the city or the library might know where you would have to go. Sorry we can’t be of more help on that. As for having worked there, how interesting! Would you be open to being interviewed about your experiences while you were there?

  2. Jaret Stevens says:

    would like an update to this, as my wife works at a mental health facility nearby and has reported/ reports of numorous paranormal activity/ unexplained phenomena. would be happy to share.

    • Hi Jaret. We haven’t investigated the area since that initial investigation but we are hoping to return there this summer (2016). If we can find any further information about the area, we will definitely be posting it. Thanks for reading about it and commenting!

  3. Gaycanuck says:

    Sounds very exciting. Looking forward to the investigation results.

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